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Food

It's the time of year that we really enjoy cooking, as it gets colder - we like making nice, warming dishes... Nut roasts & stews are great for using seasonal veg. We also eat lots of garlic, which is probably why we remain in good health. We try to eat as much fresh food as possible & we always use up leftovers by transforming them into another dish - like using tofu & mushroom pasta sauce as the base for a walnut roast.



We make our own bread & at the moment, Doris Grant's "No Knead Loaf" is the recipe we've adapted, which means we can have a loaf on the table in just over an hour!
Here's a good, easy recipe:

http://www.woolfit.com/grantloaf.html

We used to have a bread machine, but for the last 5 years we've enjoyed making it by hand!
The book "Dough" is very easy to understand & the photographs just make you desperate to get started!




We try to buy most of our food locally (from mainly farms & friends) without lots of packaging, we occasionally use the Co-op & try to avoid the big supermarkets. We are lucky that there's a small group of us locally that have formed a kind of food co-op, which enables us to buy from a whole food wholesaler. We would love to see more sharing & co-operation in our local community & our transition group continues to encourage get-togethers & hopefully makes a positive difference to other people's lives. We bought the "Local Food" book last year & have found it really inspiring!
'Local Food' is an inspirational and practical guide for creating local food initiatives showing how we can restore and establish community networks to generate healthy, locally produced food. Many people already buy their vegetables as locally as possible, eat organic and seasonal food when they can, and may even be getting to grips with managing an allotment. But with current economic pressures and mounting concerns about climate change and peak oil, there is a growing feeling that we need to do more to reduce dependence on the global food market. Local Food offers an inspiring and practical guide to what can be achieved if you get together with the people on your street or in your village, town or city. It explores a huge range of initiatives for rebuilding a diverse, resilient local food network including community gardens, farmers markets, Community Supported Agriculture schemes and projects in schools and includes all the information you will need to get ideas off the ground. Drawing on the practical experience of Transition initiatives and other community projects around the world, Local Food demonstrates the power of working collaboratively. In today s culture of supermarkets and food miles, an explosion of activity at community level is urgently needed. This book is the ideal place to start.

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