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No Impact Week - Public Transport vs Private Transport



Today, we decided to try out our local public transport, instead of using the car. It took us nearly 30 minutes to get to the bus stop in the nearby village & had the bus been on time - we would have missed it! It wasn't an enjoyable experience, but we're glad we did it. We always try to do as much as possible when we do go into town - which is usually no more than once a week.

We have our own business, providing a green housekeeping service to holiday & private homes in the area. Our work is all within 2 - 5 miles from where we live, but we do use the car, as we have to transport lots of laundry & cleaning equipment. Perhaps one day we'll have an electric vehicle!





Here's Sime's take on our day...

"Of the two, which one is the more eco-friendly form of transportation? Correct, it's public transport, in this case the bus that Kay and I took to our nearest town St.Awful, sorry, St.Austell today. What makes it more eco-friendly than the good old privately owned automobile? Well, it was nearly full of folks which is a good thing and that's all I can say about it.
I have little experience of using public transport outside the UK. No that's a blatant lie. Some years ago, we took a commuter bus from New Jersey into the Port Authority terminal in Manhattan. It was practically free and chock full of sweaty business people. Then there were times too numerous to mention (but I will) on the lovely islands of Malta and Gozo when we careered around dusty roads in brightly decorated omnibuses (omnibi?) and were never less than delighted when we disembarked with limbs intact. Again, unreasonably inexpensive and sardine-like in their capacity. More sweat than Manhattan too if that's your thing. It's not mine, but if you like, I could compile a pamphlet. A thin pamphlet of course, because as I said, my experience of public transport is limited.
Would I prefer to use our car for this journey next time? Yes is the answer. A resounding YES! Either that or repeatedly bang a door into my head. Firstly it was expensive. £10 return for the two of us. We could have done it for under £5 in the car. The journey by car takes 20-30 minutes. The bus took 50 minutes by taking an indirect route to stops in the middle of nowhere to pick sometimes no one up. We had to endure the moaning of local people complaining that the bus was annoyingly full of STRANGERS. Yes, we had purchased a ticket and sat down nearby thus upsetting their routine. On and on they groaned. Sad bastards. The screaming child entered with her parents near journey's end and we sat behind a lady who  probably 1) Spent much of her adult life supervising ladies of loose morals and 2) sported a face like a Rottweiler licking urine off a shed door. Aah, yes, that unmistakeable aroma of cheap scent masking  last nights deep fried sausages. You can't open a window on these buses you know. Actually, we had a nice time together as we always do once in the metropolis. A stroll to the library, a beverage in the coffee shop and an armful of second-hand reading material purchased in Oxfam. Splendid.
The journey home was better. Not so many people & room to stretch the legs. Mine of course.We walked the final mile home in the pouring rain and got soaked to the bone. 
The car next time."
Simon - wishing he had hair to tear out!



It wasn't all bad...

Half way from home to the bus stop
St Awful
Oxfam Second-Hand Book Shop
Outside the Library
St Austell Library
Heading Home
Bus with a view
Storm on it's way
Long Walk Back
Home Sweet Home
Tired but Happy!
                                                                   

                         Kay & Sime xx                                      













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